British Indian Arora said: “This was really great news, a great breakthrough, a complete game-changer. We always knew HAL was a huge machine, and they’d try to keep everyone out of their world.”(Photo: Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images).


BRITISH business tycoon Surinder Arora has applauded a major development related to his enthusiasm to construct Heathrow’s third runway.

Arora has been making sustained efforts to take control of the airport’s extension from operator Heathrow Airport Limited (HAL).

Now, the Civil Aviation Authority has hired an independent consultant to have a detailed analysis of whether the British airport could be built and operated by more than a single business.

Heathrow and Arora, a major landowner around the airport, have been under stiff competition for the airport project.

Both have been trying to control the building of a third runway, and they reportedly appear unwilling to work jointly.

British Indian Arora said: “This was really great news, a great breakthrough, a complete game-changer. We always knew HAL was a huge machine, and they’d try to keep everyone out of their world.”

This is for the first time the UK’s aviation officials are considering to break the tight grip of the airport’s operator.

Arora has gained the support of Heathrow’s biggest customer, British Airways owner IAG. The chief executive officer of IAG Willie Walsh has favoured the prospect of competition.

Last year, the British parliament gave its nod for the proposed Heathrow’s extension. However, there are still concerns over the support by politicians and the implementation of the project.

Brought up in humble circumstances – when he arrived in Britain he could barely speak English – Surinder Arora, the founder of the Arora Group, has created one of the country’s leading hospitality businesses.

Arora, chairman and founder of the Arora property group, recently inaugurated his 16th hotel – the Hilton Garden Inn at Heathrow.

His offices are on the other side of Heathrow, opposite the Hilton Garden Inn.

According to Arora, HAL’s monopoly has pushed up prices. “Schiphol in Amsterdam has six runways, yet Schiphol’s landing charges are half of Heathrow’s. Heathrow is three times more than Dublin airport.”

Meanwhile, HAL commented that a different operator would significantly aggravate passenger service and raise expenditure.