Bringing music to the Three Worlds


by ASJAD NAZIR VIRAM JASANI LOOKS BACK ON AN AMAZING CAREER AND AHEAD TO EXCITING SERIES OF EVENTS HAVING arrived in the UK as a child with his fam­ily in 1949, the first connection Viram Jasani had with music was listening to his father’s collection of old 78rpm records, which he brought with him from East Africa. Another important inspiration during his childhood was acclaimed singer Shamshad Bai, who was the mother of legendary star Naseem Banu and grand­mother of Bollywood actress Saira Banu. She enchant­ed those living in London with her magical voice and would become Viram’s first teacher. He would encoun­ter many other famous artists at his house growing up. Being surrounded by music at a young age led him to learn the sitar and embark on an extraordi­nary journey built around a love for Indian classical tradition. Viram balanced a hugely successful career in business with becoming a leading exponent of the sitar, promoting new talent, breaking new ground and becoming a driving force for Asian Music Cir­cuit, which has kept the Indian clas­sical music tradition alive with unforgettable concerts across decades. His many landmark achievements include perform­ing alongside iconic rock group led Zeppelin, playing at major festivals, composing for films and being the first person to introduce live sitar to Prince Charles in the early seventies. He is highly respected by all the major artists in India and has had a material impact on perceptions about Asian music for over 40 years. Despite being retired now, he is continuing to be a driving force and looking forward to the upcoming Music Of The Three Worlds concerts and exhibi­tion in London. Eastern Eye caught up with the great British music hero to talk about his amazing journey, classical tradition, forthcoming concerts and more… What drew you towards the…

You do not have access to this content. You need to create an account.