Mohammed Amin blasted the favourite to be prime minister after he compared veil-wearing Muslim women to letterboxes and bank robbers (Photo of Boris Johnson by Leon Neal/Getty Images).


THE frontrunner in the race to replace Theresa May, Boris Johnson today (14) faced severe criticism and compared to Adolf Hitler by a Muslim leader in the Conservative Party.

Mohammed Amin blasted the favourite to be prime minister after he compared veil-wearing Muslim women to letterboxes and bank robbers.

He also blamed the Tory leadership frontrunner for not having the “basic morality and integrity” to be prime minister.

The Conservative Muslim Forum chairman vowed to resign the party after over three decades if Johnson reaches number 10.

Amin claimed Johnson mocked Muslim women in his ill-famed ‘letterboxes’ newspaper column for his own political purposes.

He told the BBC: “…we don’t expect our politicians, our prime ministers, to be saints. But we do require a basic level of morality and integrity.

“And of all the candidates in the Conservative Party leadership election, Johnson is the only one I believe fails that test. And I’m not prepared to be a member of a party that chooses him as its leader.

“I would resign after 36 years”, he said.

Johnson made his comments about Muslim veils in a newspaper column in 2018. He felt “fully entitled” to expect women to remove face coverings when talking to him at his MP’s surgery, Johnson added in his article.

Johnson described that the burqa was oppressive and it was “absolutely ridiculous that people should choose to go around looking like letterboxes”.

Johnson won 114 MPs’ backing on Thursday (13), more than his three closest rivals combined.

Meanwhile, Johnson backer Priti Patel said she “took issue” with some of Amin’s comments.

Patel said Johnson “was not mocking women”, and accused Amin of “personal angst” against the frontrunner.

She further noted: “I disagree and I’m sorry to hear a member of our party feels that way.”

Adolf Hitler’s rise as an influential leader started through democratic polls at a time of national crisis in the 1930s.