NHS test and trace service proves highly effective; reaches over 250,000 people since launch


NHS
NHS

THE NHS test and trace service has reached more than a quarter of a million people since its launch, says official data.

The service has reached over 79 per cent of all those who test positive, and 83.4 per cent of their contacts where contact details were provided.

As many as 3,962 people who tested positive for coronavirus were reached by the contact tracers and asked to share details of their close contacts during 30 July to 5 August.

During the period, 15,308 close contacts of patients were reached and advised to self-isolate.

According to the official data, 53,427 people have newly tested positive for coronavirus in England since 28 May 2020, with 52,735 transferred for contact tracing – including some people testing positive before contact tracing began.

As a next step to tackle the pandemic, trials for the new NHS test and trace app started on Thursday (13) ahead of the nationwide roll out.

“It’s really important that we make it as easy as possible for everyone to engage with NHS test and trace. By launching an app that supports our integrated, localised approach to NHS Test and Trace, anyone with a smartphone will be able to find out if they are at risk of having caught the virus, quickly and easily order a test, and access the right guidance and advice,” said Dido Harding, executive chair of the NHS test and trace programme.

“There is no silver bullet when it comes to tackling coronavirus.”

During the week ending August 5, as many as 438,404  people were newly tested for Covid-19 under pillar 1 (testing in hospitals and outbreak locations) and pillar 2 (national swab testing) in England.

Test results for 88.2 per cent of people tested under pillar 1 were made available within 24 hours. In-person testing at mobile testing units, and walk-through and drive-through testing sites returned 93.6 per cent of results the next day, the statement further said.

England’s NHS test and trace programme has worked closely with major tech companies, including Google and Apple, scientists within the Alan Turing Institute, medical experts, privacy groups, at-risk communities and teams in countries across the world such as Germany using similar apps.