Youth vows to sue University of South Wales for £200K


Riaz started his studies in 2011. However, he had to re-sit his first year after he failed to get the credits he required (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images).
Riaz started his studies in 2011. However, he had to re-sit his first year after he failed to get the credits he required (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images).

A YOUTH is seeking £200,000 in damages from the University of South Wales.

Umer Riaz, 33, sought the sum after obtaining a third-class pass grade in a BSc chemistry degree.

The South Asian youth has vowed to move the highest court in the UK.

He claims that he wasn’t given the opportunity to continue for an honours degree and a higher grade.

The county court in Cardiff last week rejected his claim after the university described him as “no prospect of success”.

The youth of Pakistani origin said: “I’m going to fight this even if I have to take it higher, even to the UN.

“I’m very, very keen that I take it as high as I can.”

Riaz started his studies in 2011. However, he had to re-sit his first year after he failed to get the credits he required.

In 2014, after suffering from poor health and other issues, his second-year modules had to be deferred until the next year. Following this, Riaz did not cover enough credits for an honours degree.

The youth claims he was good at studies and is now struggling to get a job.

Riaz has been unable to continue to study for a PhD in chemistry.

He first complained to the university before moving to the Office of Independent Adjudicator (OIA) – an independent review body.

Last year, he was informed that his complaint was rejected.

A spokeswoman for the University of South Wales said: “We take all complaints seriously and are keen to uphold our rigorous standards.

“All of our processes have been followed fairly and accurately, and this has been reflected by the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education.”

Speaking about his expenses in the UK, the youth added each year of university cost him around £10,000. He has also paid out thousands in legal fees.