Jaguar Land Rover plans to build new electric XJ luxury car in Birmingham


The deliberations by the Indian conglomerate are at an early stage, and it could still approach other potential partners, media reports said quoting people with knowledge of the matter (Photo: Leon Neal/Getty Images).
The deliberations by the Indian conglomerate are at an early stage, and it could still approach other potential partners, media reports said quoting people with knowledge of the matter (Photo: Leon Neal/Getty Images).

IN a boost to the UK’s auto industry, Britain’s biggest car maker Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) has planned to produce next generation electric cars in Birmingham.

The Indian conglomerate owned JLR’s move is expected to support 2500 workers at the factory.

Tata Motors-owned firm is likely to make an official statement within a few days that Castle Bromwich plant is scheduled to make an eco-friendly version of its luxury XJ saloon, media reports said.

The latest move of the car producer has come amid concerns over Brexit and a decline in demand for JLR vehicles.

Due to hit the roads in 2020, the all-electric XJ will be able to run nearly 300 miles on a single charge.

The model is one of three electric cars planned by Jaguar, with a large SUV coming next.

The latest move by Indian business owned firm to produce the new XJ version at the production facility is not dependent on any government funding and the decision has come when the other automakers worried about the impact of Brexit.

Jaguar already producing an electric vehicle, the I-Pace, at its Magna Steyr plant in Austria.

JLR’s I-Pace, the first pure electric car has been a huge success after it reached the hands of its customers.

The new XJ is seen as more of a competitor to high-end electric marques such as Tesla. Batteries for the electric cars will come from Jaguar’s Hams Hall plant in Birmingham.

The company will make electric vehicles at its Wolverhampton engine production plant.

JLR seeks to save £2.5billion a year amid a steep decline in sales also amid steep fall in sales and Brexit concerns.