Bollywood actor Manisha Koirala who beat cancer a few years back, firmly believes that body and mind are interconnected and staying positive during her cancer treatment was “tough but achievable” for her.

Manisha Koirala, who has marked her acting profession with some brilliant movies. She started her career with the movie Saudagar in 1991, said it was “shocking” to learn about her ailment, but she said she has learnt her lessons from her painful struggle to survive the disease. Earlier I used to fall apart and crumble even while facing small challenges in life. But I had no choice this time. I had to face the situation positively and be brave and have faith in myself. I firmly believe that body and mind are inter connected. The body reacts accordingly to a negative and a positive mind. It is really essential to stay positive for all those who are going through this challenge. It is tough but it is achievable.”

The actor was attending a programme, “Hausla- Fight against Cancer” here organised by NGO Grameen Sneh Foundation. She said she tries to motivate other patients to have hope and get the best treatment they can. “When I meet cancer patients, the only thing that I tell them is to get a better medical treatment. Every decade is a change of experience and mind-set. In today’s world, there are many examples of cancer survivors. So one must have hope,” she said.

 

Koirala has been associated with the NGO, which has been working to support cancer patients across the country, for the past three years. Under the programme, she is also promoting a mobile application, Sneh Cancer App, for easy interactions between cancer patients and their doctors. She has often seen sharing details about cancer and spreading awareness about it on social media.

#OvarianCancer is the most aggressive #Cancer which afflict women. It is vital to know its silent #Symptoms.#OvarianCancerAwarenessMonth

Posted by Manisha Koirala on Saturday, 2 September 2017

According to Sneha Routray, president of Grameen Sneh Foundation, said more than 900 cancer patients have benefitted from the programme.

To which she said, “We have been running this programme in rural areas where we screen people and make them aware about the disease. Lack of information is one of the main reasons behind the increase in the number of cancer patients.”